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Monthly Archives: December 2012

  • Snowflakes for Sandy Hook Elementary

    December 27, 2012

    Words cannot describe the grief and sadness that we felt when we heard the news of the Sandy Hook school shooting.

    The PTA will welcome the students to their new school with a winter wonderland, and are asking people to send snowflakes to decorate the school.

    Please make a few snowflakes, if you don't have a design Steve Wilson, owner of Anita Goodesign has made one available for you to download.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/snowflake/Hdsfl13.dst

    http://www.moores-sew.com/snowflake/Hdsfl13.pes

    http://www.moores-sew.com/snowflake/Hdsfl13.vp3

    Please drop them off at your local Moore's Sewing Center on or before Saturday, January 5th. They need to arrive at the PTA office by January 12, 2013. Thank you for your support.

    Instructions for Freestanding Lace: 1. Hoop one piece of water soluble stabilizer. (Use two pieces if your design is larger than 3 inches square.) 2. Match your bobbin thread to your top thread. 3. Embroider the design,

    4. Trim the excess stabilizer away. 5. Rinse with warm water.

    6. Blot dry with a paper towel and let dry.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Cascading Scarf

    December 27, 2012

    Foofaraw - rhymes with crosscut saw and one definition is frills and flashy finery. When created with a flimsy fabric with flashy threads running through it, this is a fine foofaraw scarf. When created with a flimsy, not-so-flashy fabric, this might be a fashion statement scarf. Determined by the fabric, the construction ranges from extra-simple to simple. We tackle extra-simple in this issue.

    The construction of the scarf in the picture above was demonstrated at the December Sew Fun Club meetings. As promised (and we always try to keep our promises), here are the instructions for making an extra-simple scarf.

    Supplies: – ½ yard of fabric that looks good on both sides – 1 ½ yards of 1/4” wide clear elastic (enough for a 100 inch long scarf)

    Instructions: 1. Cut two 7 inch wide by width of fabric strips 2. Sew the two pieces right-sides together across one short end (unless you want a really long scarf, trim off  any excess of about 45 inches from the center seam) 3. Set up your serger for a 3 thread rolled edge with a 3.0 width and 1.5R length. 4. To add a hint of shine, use embroidery thread in the upper and lower loopers. 5. Serge the long raw edges. 6. If the short ends have a selvage edge then doing a rolled hem is optional. The foofaraw fabric of the sample came with a fringed selvage – just a lucky happenstance. 7. Apply seam sealant to corners and let dry before trimming off excess thread tails. 8. Along the long direction of the scarf, press mark the center of fabric by folding long edges together and pressing. 9. Cut elastic half the length of the fabric plus 4”. 10. Measure in 2” from each end of the elastic and mark with a pen. 11. At the marks on the elastic, pin the elastic to the wrong-side at each end of the scarf on the center (fold) line. The elastic should extend 1 1/2” beyond the fabric. The extra length will give you something to hold while stretching the elastic and stitching close to the ends of the scarf. 12. Use a scrap of fabric and a piece of elastic to make a test sample(s) to get the feel of working with the fabric/elastic combination. You can start with the sewing machine set for a 2.0mm wide 2.0mm length zig-zag stitch. Follow steps 13 to 14 with your practice piece(s). Remember that you must stretch the elastic consistently to about twice its relaxed length as you sew it down. This requires you to stretch the elastic with one hand behind the needle and the other hand in front of the needle while letting the feed dogs move the fabric under the needle. When you have made a satisfactory sample, proceed to step 13 to do it for real. 13. Start and end stitching with a back tack 5/8” from each end of the fabric. 14. Stretch elastic, centering over the center (fold) mark, and sew down the middle of the elastic. 15. Clip off the excess elastic.

    16. You're finished.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Hand Warmers for Cold Mornings

    December 18, 2012

    Baby it's cold outside, but at least your hands can be warm. On cold mornings, you can warm your hands with these pocket-size rice-filled bags. Just 20 seconds in the microwave and the warmers are ready to go. If you made any flannel projects or gifts recently, you probably have scraps big enough to make some warmers.

    Supplies: ¼ yard each of two coordinating flannel fabrics (wash, dry and iron before cutting) 1 cup uncooked rice

    Cutting Instructions:

    4 – 5 1/2” x 5 1/2” squares from main flannel fabric 2 – 5 1/2” x 8” rectangles from coordinating flannel

    Instructions:

    1. Fold the 5 1/2” x 8” rectangles in half, wrong-side together to form 5 1/2” x 4” pockets. Press.

    2. Place one pocket piece on the right-side of one of the 5 1/2” squares. Line up raw edges. The pocket folded edge will be 1 1/2” down from the main fabric edge. 3. Place a second 5 1/2” square right-side facing down. 4. Pin the three layers together.

    5. Stitch with a 1/2” seam allowance around the sides leaving a 2” wide opening. Hint: leave the opening along the edge of the square that is only 2 fabric layers thick. 6. Clip the corners.

    7. Turn right-side out. Push the corners out using a point turner or chopstick. 8. Press.

    9. Add ½ cup of rice. A funnel helps. 10. Pin the opening closed to keep rice grains out of your sewing machine. 11. Edge stitch across the opening. Photo above is a close up of the edge stitching 12. Repeat the process to make the second hand warmer.

    Heating Instructions: Place both hand warmers in a microwave on high heat for 20 seconds. Shake the hand warmers to distribute the warmed rice. For first time use in a particular microwave, carefully check the temperature of the pocket before placing all fingers inside.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Fleece Scarf with Embroidery

    December 11, 2012

    Fleece is an interesting and unusual, though ubiquitous fabric. It's lightweight and stretchy. It's great for sewing and embroidery projects because it comes in a variety of colors and weights. And it does not fray – which can't be said for most fabrics....

    Supplies: Needle – sharp, universal or embroidery - size 75/11 Stabilizer – water soluble for backing Stabilizer – topper to prevent stitches from sinking down into the fleece Fleece – choose a high-quality fleece for your embroidery project. High-quality fleece will snap back into shape after being stretched Embroidery design – Use designs that aren't too dense. The designs used in this project are from Winter Wonderland by Anita Goodesign

    Instructions: 1. Use a bobbin with the same color thread that you'll be using on top. 2. Hoop the backing stabilizer. 3. Stitch basting line to use for placement. 4. Place fleece and topper over placement line and sew basting stitch again. 5. The topper will prevent stitches from sinking into fleece. 6. Embroider the design. 7. Remove from hoop.

    8. Gently tear the excess topper off and cut away the water-soluble stabilizer being careful not to cut the fleece or any stitching. Dissolve all of the remaining stabilizer by soaking the scarf in water.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Candy Cane Holders

    December 4, 2012

    Differentiate your candy cane from the rest with its own special holder. Supplies: Dakota Design CD - Appliquè Candy Cane Holders (20 designs included with detailed instructions) Water soluble stabilizer Fabric for the appliquès - Maximum size needed for the front and back of each holder will be 2 pieces 4” x 3 1/2” Tape, such as blue painter's tape Fray Check Candy Cane Instructions:

    1. Hoop water soluble stabilizer.

    2. Sew the tack down stitch to hold the appliquè fabric in place. Trim the fabric close to the outside of the tack down stitches. 3. Embroider the design through the last outline step. 4. On the back of the stabilizer, tape a piece of appliquè fabric that extends at least ¼ inch past the  the outline stitches. 5. Stitch the tack down color change to hold the appliquè fabric in place. 6. Remove tape and trim the fabric close to the outside of the tack down stitches. 7. Change bobbin thread to match top thread. 8. Embroider the rest of the design. 9. Stabilize the buttonholes with Fray Check, let dry. 10. Remove from hoop and cut excess water soluble stabilizer away from design. 11. Cut buttonholes open.

    12. Using a damp sponge, remove excess water-soluble stabilizer. 13. Add candy cane.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog

    Candy Cane Holders

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/finished-project-475x356.gif

    Differentiate your candy cane from the rest with its own special holder. Supplies: Dakota Design CD - Appliqué Candy Cane Holders (20 designs included with detailed instructions) Water soluble stabilizer Fabric for the appliquès - Maximum size needed for the front and back of each holder will be 2 pieces 4” x 3 1/2” Tape, such as blue painter’s tape Fray Check Candy Cane Instructions:

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/hoop-stabilizer-300x225.gif 1. Hoop water soluble stabilizer.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/cut-away-top-fabric-300x225.gif 2. Sew the tack down stitch to hold the appliquè fabric in place. Trim the fabric close to the outside of the tack down stitches. 3. Embroider the design through the last outline step.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/add-fabric-to-back-300x225.gif 4. On the back of the stabilizer, tape a piece of appliqué fabric that extends at least ¼ inch past the outline stitches.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/back-side-300x225.gif 5. Stitch the tack down color change to hold the appliqué fabric in place.http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/trim-excess-fabric-on-back-300x225.gif 6. Remove tape and trim the fabric close to the outside of the tack down stitches. 7. Change bobbin thread to match top thread.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/final-stitching-300x225.gif 8. Embroider the rest of the design.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/fray-check-300x225.gif 9. Stabilize the buttonholes with Fray Check, let dry.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/cut-away-stabilizer-300x225.gif 10. Remove from hoop and cut excess water soluble stabilizer away from design.http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/cut-buttonholes-300x225.gif 11. Cut buttonholes open.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/clean-edges-300x225.gif 12. Using a damp sponge, remove excess water-soluble stabilizer. 13. Add candy cane.

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