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Monthly Archives: January 2013

  • Hugs and Kisses Heart Pocket

    January 29, 2013

    I think it is time to do a project that requires embroidery design software. Many people use purchased embroidery designs, and can change the finished results by omitting or repeating certain stitch-out parts of the design as instructed in an earlier blog. But, there are limits to the modifications you can make during the stitch-out process.

    The instructions in this project are specific to Floriani Total Control Pro software. Basic familiarity with Floriani TCP is necessary to supplement these instructions.

    Supplies: Floriani Total Control Pro Software Red and White felt White embroidery thread Floriani Tear-away stabilizer Floriani Water soluble stabilizer Pinking shears

    Instructions: 1. Turn on Grid and set size to .50 inches. 2. Click on Appliquè Shapes.

    3. Select Heart shape and click OK to Select. 4. In the Properties box, change Appliquè width to 4.5mm. 5. Click on Apply.

    6. Click on Copy icon. 7. Open New workspace. 8. Click on Paste icon.

    9. Click on  Shape Tool. 10. Place cursor about 1 and 1/2” down from the top of the Heart on the left side, right click to bring up menu and left click on  Split Line. 11. Repeat above step on the right side of the Heart. 12. In the Sequence View, you will see two appliquè shapes instead of one. 13. Select the top half of the Heart and Delete. 14. You should only have the lower half of the heart left. 15. Highlight the lower half of the Heart and right click to display pop-up menu and click on Convert To and select Run.

    16. Copy and Paste the lower half of the Heart. 17. To create a color stop, change one of the lower halves to another color. 18. You should have two shapes that look like the letter V in the Sequence View. 19. Select the Text Tool and left click on the workspace. 20. In the Properties Box type in XOXO. 21. Select Curlyq font and set the height to .40 inches, click on Apply. 22. Position XOXO on lower half of heart where you want it. 23. Open the appliquè heart design workspace and Copy the Heart design. 24. Return to the lower half heart workspace page and Paste the appliquè heart design. (If the Paste icon is grayed out you are likely still in Text mode. To exit Text mode left click on the Select arrow.) 25.  If the designs do not line up, move one of them so the bottoms of the hearts line up. 26. Save the design as heart pocket.c2s and Save again in the format for your machine.

    At the Embroidery Machine:

    1. Hoop the tear-away stabilizer in the 130mm x 180mm hoop, or a hoop size available for your machine. 2. Place the hoop on the machine. 3. Thread machine with white embroidery thread on top and in bobbin. 4. Sew the placement line (shown in red above) for the lower heart. 5. Place red felt over stitching line and sew the tack-down line. 6. Sew text. 7. Remove hoop from machine and stabilizer from hoop. 8. Use pinking shears to finish the top edge. 9. Cut felt close to the outer stitching line on the two sides. Set aside. 10. Hoop water soluble stabilizer in the 130mm x 180mm hoop, or a hoop size available for your machine. 11. Attach hoop to embroidery machine. 12. Sew the placement line for the whole heart design. 13. Place white felt over placement line and sew the tack down line. 14. Remove hoop from machine, DO NOT remove stabilizer from hoop. 15. Trim white felt close to stitching line. 16. Place the lower half heart on top of the whole heart with the bottom edges aligned. 17.  Use clear or painter's tape to hold lower half in place. Place tape at each top edge corner and the lower point. 18. Attach hoop to embroidery machine. 19. Sew the last color. 20. Remove hoop from machine and stabilizer from hoop. Remove tape. 21. Trim away excess water soluble stabilizer. 22. Use a wet sponge to remove remaining stabilizer from outside edge. 23. Your heart pocket is now ready to fill with a special message or gift.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Pillowcase with Decorative Cuff

    January 22, 2013

    This project is simple, but extremely useful. Well, the concept of a pillowcase is simple, but the construction of this one is complicated by the incorporation of French seams. French seams were popular before the availability of a serger became fairly common.  The raw fabric edges are completely contained in a French seam. To add to the intrigue, and maybe add some confusion, there is also a special seam that attaches the cuff to the rest of the case. This seam requires the bulk of the pillowcase to be pulled through the small end opening of the cuff. If you already are familiar with these construction techniques, skip the details and sew up some custom pillowcases. If these seam types are new to you, carefully follow the instruction steps, and you likely will be amazed that ins and outs and insides and outsides can become outs and ins  and outsides and insides. It's magic, it's fabric manipulation.

    Pillowcases can be made for a special occasion by selecting fabric appropriate for the occasion. Or, pillowcases can be made with unique 'identifying' fabric to differentiate them from other pillowcases.

    Materials: – Main fabric –  27" x 41” – Cuff fabric – 11” x 41”

    Instructions: 1. For reference purposes, cross-sections of the French seam and the cuff seam are provided below.

    2. White lines always represent the Wrong-side of the fabric. Red lines represent the Right-side of the main body fabric. Green lines represent the Right-side of the cuff fabric.  Stitching is shown by black lines.

    3. Place the cuff fabric right side up. 4. Place the main fabric right side up and long sides together on top of the cuff fabric. 5. Line up the raw edges and pin to hold in place. 6. Starting at the bottom of the main fabric, roll towards the top where the pins are. 7. Keep rolling until you see the loose edge of the cuff. 8. Bring the cuff up over the main fabric to the pinned edge. 9. Line up the cuff fabric with the other raw edges and pin the three layers together. Be careful to avoid pinning any part of the roll. This technique has been referred to as a “burrito”.

    10. Being very careful to avoid sewing through any part of the roll, sew along the the pinned edge with a 3/8” seam allowance. 11. Pull the main fabric out one end of the cuff. Press. 12. Lay the combined pieces out flat. Trim the cuff-main fabric edges if necessary. 13. This pillowcase is going to be finished with French seams so there will be no raw edges inside your pillowcase. 14. Fold pillowcase in half with WRONG-sides together. 15. Pin match the ends of the seam where the cuff meets the main fabric. Sew along the entire long edge with a 1/4” seam allowance and across the end of the main fabric. 16. Turn pillowcase wrong-side out. Press. Sew with a 3/8” seam allowance along the side and end over previously stitched seam. This will enclose the raw edges. 17. Turn right-side out and press.

    If you have a serger, you may serge the seams instead of doing a 'french seam'.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Door Organizer

    January 15, 2013

    It seems to me that most of us want to get organized in one or more ways. Without going into details of what might be candidates for organizational efforts, which could run on for pages, this project is simple and might be useful for something as simple as being able to find a shopping list and cell phone as we're hurrying out the door.

    Supplies:

    – Heavyweight, fusible web such as Floriani Stitch N Shape - 3 pieces - one of each size listed – 7” x 10”, 7” x 7” and 7” x 5” – fabric for base (front) 7-1/2” x 10-1/2” – fabric for base (back) 7-1/2” x 10-1/2” – fabric for big pocket: 7-1/2” x 14-1/2” – fabric for small pocket; 7-1/2” x 10-1/2" – fabric for binding; 2-1/2” x 45”

    A rectangular or square ruler with grid lines, rotary cutter and mat are handy devices for this project.

    Prepare the base:

    1. Place the 7” x 10” piece of fusible web on the wrong side of the 7-1/2” x 10-1/2” front base fabric. Center the web and fuse. Trim the fabric to the edges of the web. 2. With the front fabric sandwich web-side up, place the 7-1/2” x 10-1/2” back fabric right-side up on the fusible web, center over the sandwich, and fuse. 3. Trim the back fabric to the edges of the web.

    Make the pockets:

    1. Fold the 7-1/2” x 14 1/2” piece of fabric wrong-side together to make a roughly 7” inch square and finger press. Insert the fusible web between the “flaps” of the square until an edge of the fusible web is firmly in the fabric fold. Fuse the web to one flap. 2. Open the fabric, remove the paper from the web, close the flap and heat again to fuse the fabric to both sides of the web. 3. On three sides of the sandwich - NOT the folded side - trim the fabric even with the web.

    4. In the same manner, prepare the small (5” high) pocket using the 7-1/2” x 10 1/2” piece of fabric and the 7” x 5” interfacing piece. 5. Position the 5” pocket on top of the 7” pocket and then position both pockets on the base fabric, aligning the raw edges at the bottom. 6. Baste along the sides and bottom of the pockets 1/8” or so from the edges.

    Finishing:

    1. Bind using your favorite method. 2. Sew a button at the top center. Tie a piece of ribbon around the button so you can hang the organizer from a door handle. 3. Determine what door will be host to the organizer....  the idea is to put things you might need when you pass through a particular door in the organizer on that door. For example, put a shopping list and maybe car keys on the door to the garage. Let your imagination guide you.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
  • Applique Letter-in-Circle

    January 10, 2013

    Have you ever had an embroidery design package that was not really 'your thing' but contained some designs that you really liked? For me, the new Anita Goodesign Party Flags release is one of those packages – I really like the letter-in-circle embroidery designs, but I don't have a use for party flags. So I made some minor changes to the embroidery design to suit my use. Believe it or not, an embroidery design is not cast in concrete – it is stitches in fabric – and there are ways to make changes to how a design is sewn – ways that range from very simple to requiring computer software.

    I brought the stitch file for the letter I wanted to use into my embroidery software and deleted the stitching lines for the flag. If you do not have software that will allow you to do this, you can just skip those stitching lines when your machine is about to sew them. To use any of the flag designs in this package as used in this project, the first two steps and the last one are not sewn.

    Items other than flags that might be worthy of letter-in-circle designs are hand towels, tote bags, blankets – in summary about any piece of fabric on which you would like to have one or more circled letter(s) or number(s) or a combination of both.

    Materials:

    --One 4” piece of appliquè fabric for circle. To give it more body, use a heavy weight spray starch and press.

    --Two pieces of medium weight tear-away stabilizer --Towel you want to put your design on --Temporary spray adhesive, such as kk2000

    Instructions:

    1. Hoop medium weight tear-away stabilizer. 2.  Stitch out the placement line on stabilizer. 3. Place appliquè fabric over placement line and stitch out the next color that is the tack down line. 4. Skip the next color, it is the satin stitch around the circle, we will do it last. 5. Stitch out the letter.

    6. Remove from hoop and tear away the stabilizer. 7. Stabilizer removed.

    8. Trim close to the placement line, being careful not to cut the outer circle of thread. (I don't know why, but in this picture the black and purple looks brown and pink. This project was not tortured. No fabric or thread was harmed during the production of this object.)

    9. Position the appliquè on the towel where you want it. Recommended placement is centered and 2 to 3 inches up from the bottom. 10. Using a fabric marker, place a mark at top, bottom and each side of appliquè. These marks will be your guides to find the center of the circle. 11. Using a ruler and a fabric marker, mark the center of the circle. If you have an embroidery machine that uses a 'snowman' for perfect placement, you can place a snowman to control both the position and orientation (lean to left or right) automatically. Of course, a circle does not have any lean to left or right, it is the exception to needing to orient a design. 12. Hoop another piece of medium weight stabilizer and spray lightly with temporary spray adhesive, such as kk2000.  I usually do not hoop a terry cloth towel because the fabric is so thick and stretchy. Sticking it down to the stabilizer generally causes less distortion of the towel fabric and a better final result of the embroidery or appliquè. Also, not all hoops can handle the thickness of terry cloth. 13. Lay towel on top of hooped stabilizer positioning the center under the needle. 14. Stitch the placement line again. 15. Spray the backside of the appliquè fabric with temporary spray adhesive and place on towel over placement line.

    16. Skip the next color, which should be the straight tack down stitch, and stitch out the satin stitch.

    17. Remove from hoop and tear away stabilizer. Be sure to remove the inner circle of stabilizer before using or gifting your project.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog
    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_56211-475x356.gif

    Have you ever had an embroidery design package that was not really 'your thing' but contained some designs that you really liked? For me, the new Anita Goodesign Party Flags release is one of those packages – I really like the letter-in-circle embroidery designs, but I don't have a use for party flags. So I made some minor changes to the embroidery design to suit my use. Believe it or not, an embroidery design is not cast in concrete – it is stitches in fabric – and there are ways to make changes to how a design is sewn – ways that range from very simple to requiring computer software.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/2013-01-04_133351-202x300.png

    I brought the stitch file for the letter I wanted to use into my embroidery software and deleted the stitching lines for the flag. If you do not have software that will allow you to do this, you can just skip those stitching lines when your machine is about to sew them. To use any of the flag designs in this package as used in this project, the first two steps and the last one are not sewn.

    Items other than flags that might be worthy of letter-in-circle designs are hand towels, tote bags, blankets – in summary about any piece of fabric on which you would like to have one or more circled letter(s) or number(s) or a combination of both.

    Materials:

    --One 4” piece of appliquè fabric for circle. To give it more body, use a heavy weight spray starch and press.

    --Two pieces of medium weight tear-away stabilizer --Towel you want to put your design on --Temporary spray adhesive, such as kk2000

    Instructions:

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5599-300x225.gif

    1. Hoop medium weight tear-away stabilizer.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5601-300x225.gif 2.  Stitch out the placement line on stabilizer.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5602-300x225.gif 3. Place appliquè fabric over placement line and stitch out the next color that is the tack down line. 4. Skip the next color, it is the satin stitch around the circle, we will do it last.http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5603-300x225.gif 5. Stitch out the letter.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5614-300x225.gif 6. Remove from hoop and tear away the stabilizer.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5615-300x225.gif 7. Stabilizer removed.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5616-300x225.gif 8. Trim close to the placement line, being careful not to cut the outer circle of thread. (I don't know why, but in this picture the black and purple looks brown and pink. This project was not tortured. No fabric or thread was harmed during the production of this object.)

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5617-300x225.gif 9. Position the appliquè on the towel where you want it. Recommended placement is centered and 2 to 3 inches up from the bottom.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5610-300x225.gif 10. Using a fabric marker, place a mark at top, bottom, and each side of applique. These marks will be your guides to find the center of the circle.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5611-300x225.gif 11. Using a ruler and a fabric marker, mark the center of the circle. If you have an embroidery machine that uses a 'snowman' for perfect placement, you can place a snowman to control both the position and orientation (lean to left or right) automatically. Of course, a circle does not have any lean to left or right, it is the exception to needing to orient a design. 12. Hoop another piece of medium weight stabilizer and spray lightly with temporary spray adhesive, such as kk2000.  I usually do not hoop a terry cloth towel because the fabric is so thick and stretchy. Sticking it down to the stabilizer generally causes less distortion of the towel fabric and a better final result of the embroidery or appliquè. Also, not all hoops can handle the thickness of terry cloth.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5612-300x225.gif 13. Lay towel on top of hooped stabilizer positioning the center under the needle.http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5613-300x225.gif 14. Stitch the placement line again.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_56171-300x225.gif 15. Spray the backside of the appliquè fabric with temporary spray adhesive and place on towel over placement line.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5619-300x225.gif 16. Skip the next color, which should be the straight tack down stitch, and stitch out the satin stitch.

    http://www.moores-sew.com/blog_files/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/100_5620-300x225.gif 17. Remove from hoop and tear away stabilizer. Be sure to remove the inner circle of stabilizer before using or gifting your project.

  • Hot Pad with Swirls

    January 2, 2013

    If you think this looks like an oversized 'Glass Slipper' (see earlier blog article), you would be right. Score one for yourself. But, due to the stitching required to 'jazz up' the edges, there is no opening for the base of a gigantic wine glass or brandy snifter. Using the same construction technique as that of the glass slipper, we add a layer of batting - preferably with thermal properties, and 'presto-mako' we have a hot pad with a decorative twist – sorry, decorative swirl. Materials: six – 9” squares of fabric – all of one fabric, or all different fabrics, or some combination one – 8” square Insul-Bright from The Warm Company one – 2” square of fabric to peek out between the swirls (optional) Instructions:

    1. Fold a 'swirl' fabric square in half to form a triangle, wrong-sides together. Press. Repeat for the other three 'swirl' pieces. 2. Place one of the remaining fabric squares wrong-side up on table. This is the fabric that will show in the center of the swirls (unless your put in a special insert). 3. Center Insul-Bright on top of fabric square. The shiny side of your Insul-Bright should face the hot or cold item allowing it to reflect the energy back to its source. If you intend to use your hot (cold) pad with the swirls up, the shiny side of the Insul-Bright should be down in this step.

    4. Place the remaining fabric square right-side up on the batting. This fabric will become the 'back' of the hot pad. 5. As the fabric pieces in the photos are difficult to identify, the graphic above shows the sequential placement of the folded fabric triangles. For the sample with two triangles of each fabric, the odd numbered pieces are from one fabric and the even numbered pieces are from the other fabric. Lay the first three pieces down in order, rotating the pieces as illustrated. Slide the fourth piece under the exposed half of piece number one as indicated by the arrow.

    6. Align all the raw edges and pin as needed. 7. Sew a 1/2” seam allowance around the square. 8. You will get a sharper corner if, at each corner, you don’t stitch right into the corner. Instead, stop sewing before getting right into the corner, turn the fabric 45 degrees and take two stitches to get to the ½ “ seam line, then turn the fabric another 45 degrees to line up with the fabric edge and resume sewing parallel to the fabric edge. 9. Continue sewing around the square until you are back where you started. 10. Trim off the corners.

    11. Turn the hot pad right side out. Press. 12. To add the swirls, fold back the folded edge of each of the triangle shapes approximately 3/8” and pin.

    13. This will create an opening in the center. If you want a different piece of fabric showing, insert a small square of fabric. It will be held in place when you stitch the swirls. 14. Edge stitch the swirls.

    15. Edge stitch around the outer edge of  the hot pad. 16. Back view.

    Though this project is referred to as a hot (cold) pad, you may be inclined to use it as a pot holder.  If so, be careful to avoid really hot items.  This is not a hot mitt type construction with very thick insulation sufficient to protect your hand.

    Click Here for a Printable Version of this Blog

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